Hype Clothing Bonking Brand

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Is Hype Clothing Worth It? That’s a BIG Yes!

Streetwear is often referred to as “hype clothing” or “a bonking brand“. 

Do you understand what this means and why it is called that? Let’s get to the bottom of all this hype and learn more about it.

It’s well-known that Streetwear in 2021 isn’t just for the streets. Streetwear is also dominating the fashion industry and even making its mark in the luxury market.

We would never have guessed that trainers and hoodies would soon be on the fashion runways of luxury fashion houses around the globe.

So, why is streetwear so popular? And where did it come a long time ago?

Continue reading to learn how the hype around streetwear, a.k.a. hype clothing became one of the most recognizable fashion trends in history.

What is the “Hype”, built around brands?

Drops

Many streetwear brands have adopted the “drop” marketing strategy. These products are usually released in small quantities at select retail locations or online. They are often not announced and often unannounced on social media. This strategy creates a sense of urgency, exclusivity, and makes the customer believe they have to purchase the product fast in order to get an exclusive item.

Supreme is the king of streetwear and has a huge following. The brand was founded in Manhattan in 1994. It has since grown to a cult following all over the globe and collaborated with major brands like Nike, Vans, and North Face.

The brand’s “hype” and brand name can be attributed to the emphasis on clothing “drops” when new lines are released. Customers will queue for hours to obtain the new releases every week when they “drop” in their stores.

You can buy similar products in all stores, but the “bonking brand”, who will queue for hours to get the latest and greatest releases, will be able to purchase them at their local store.

Luxury fashion labels are now following the footsteps of streetwear brands and releasing their products in similar ways to these success stories.

Burberry announced last year a series drops in order to launch their streetwear-inspired range. Customers had just 24 hours to buy. It’s interesting to see top fashion houses take inspiration from streetwear companies. This raises questions about the future of clothing releases and how these “drops” will change.

Embracing these new tactics is a great way of reaching out to younger audiences and is essential for long-term survival and for ensuring they stay relevant and in the limelight, or risk being taken over by younger, more dynamic brands.

Social Media

The streetwear scene is also heavily influenced by social media and the “hype” created around brands. You can argue that social media was the catalyst for streetwear’s rise from subculture to mainstream status.

The only way to access the most recent releases before the internet was to be in the right place at right time and search the shops for limited edition items. It can be argued that these products were more accessible to consumers because of their commitment to them.

The rise of streetwear via social media means that bonking brands don’t have to hustle for the latest limited edition items. It is possible to often get them at the click of one button with little to no connection to the brand and their community.

Despite this change in culture, many of the streetwear brands have adapted to this change in consumerism, and what the internet has taken away from these brands in terms of exclusivity, it has given back in the form of “hype”.

Streetwear drops can be teased via social media for weeks or months ahead of the actual drop date. Twitter is also a key part of bringing back this community element. Twitter is now a place for hype beasts to share their theories and conspiracies about the next drop.

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